RSPCA NSW – working with rescue groups or not???

a) Steve Coleman, RSPCA NSW CEO, SMH,  RSPCA criticised.…9/10/12: “…….. rejected claims the RSPCA was unwilling to collaborate with other animal welfare organisations, adding that “discussions have been undertaken, and continue to be undertaken, with a number of community-based rescue groups”.

b) Letter sent to a NSW Member of Parliament

“I belong to a group of volunteers who rescue Alaskan Malamutes in NSW, Victoria and South Australia. We also assist in rehoming Australia wide. We are a deductible gift recipient with charity status, have public liability insurance, and all have our own malamutes www.amraa.org.au or facebook – Alaskan malamute Rehoming Aid. We have rescued over 100 Alaskan Malamutes in the last 2 ½ years in NSW alone of which 99% have been successfully rehomed.

Only one dog has been euthenased due to temperament issues and only one has not been rescued from the pound, due to issues with temperament. Otherwise we have taken all the dogs that we have been aware of in pounds – so we do not pick and choose. We enjoy a good relationship with the Animal Welfare League and many of the pounds around NSW. Our relationship with the RSPCA has been variable.

I am aware of their constraints as a large organisation, however, as a group that has animal advocacy as part of their mission statement, it is distressing that the Rutherford shelter in Newcastle has lacked any desire to allow breed specific rescue to rescue dogs. We are not the only group to find this. (DRP in bold highlight) READ MORE HERE

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RSPCA NSW want to work with rescue groups..

On the SBS Insights program last night 25 Set 2012, RSPCA CEO Steve Coleman said that RSPCA NSW works with Rescue Groups. He also explained a situation where RSPCA reached out to Rescue Groups but that none responded…

We have some logical questions: please reply in the comments below:

If you are with a rescue Group that actively and currently works with RSPCA NSW – please tell us

If you were one of the Rescue Groups that was contacted by RSPCA with an invitation to work with them, please let us know

If you are with a Rescue Groups that did not respond to the RSPCA NSW invitation please let us know why

RSPCA NSW have made it clear that they want to work with Rescue Groups.

Action that Rescue Groups can take

Please write to Steve Coleman at scoleman@rspcansw.org.au, with your rescue group request and offer to work with them.  This is a great opportunity!

I suggest that you keep copies of subsequent correspondence for reference.

Dismal situation for cats at Blacktown Pound – appeal to civic leaders of Blacktown Community

Report to Blacktown Council by concerned community members:

Summary:

Using statistics for dogs and cats seized by councils, this study looks at the current situation at the Blacktown Animal Holding Facility and the Blacktown Community.

A comparison of Blacktown with the other seven council areas, which use the pound’s facilities, showed that Blacktown was vastly over- represented. It had twice as many stray and surrendered animals as the other seven councils combined, yet Blacktown’s population is only half that of these other seven councils.

While tremendous progress has been made at the pound, with fewer dogs entering, and even far fewer being killed, the situation for cats is dismal and seemingly out of control.

The number of cats entering the pound has increased every year, with a 163% increase between 2003 and 2011.      In 2011, 3,248 cats were killed, an increase of 155% since 2003. There is evidence that suggests that over half of Blacktown’s cats are feral. READ MORE HERE

How does NSW compare to the UK for dog kill rates in council pounds?

A comparison of dog kill statistics in Council Pounds between NSW and the UK overall

The purpose of this document is to create a comparison of statistics between NSW and the UK , as information for the NSW Companion Animal Taskforce public submission 2012

Summary:

  • 3.3 times more dogs enter NSW Council pounds per head of population than enter UK Council pounds
  • Nearly 16 times more dogs per head of population, are killed by NSW Councils, than by UK Councils
  • The kill rate in Council pounds as a percent of dogs coming in, is 4.6 times higher in NSW than in the UK

The sources of statistics used for this analysis are taken from the following publications (click to open):

  1. ACAC; Contribution of the Pet Care Industry to the Australian Economy 7th Ed 2010
  2. NSW Companion Animal Taskforce;  Discussion Paper, May 2011
  3. Dogs Trust UK;  Stray Dog Survey 2011
  4. Dog News UK;  Domestic Dog Population Is Larger Than Originally Thought, 2011
  5. Wikipedia,  for human population statistics

 

Household cat/dog populations

  • UK:  10.3 million cats and 10.5 million dogs (2006)

Dogs 31% of households; Cats 26% of households (2007)

  • Australia: 3.41 million dogs and 2.35 million cats (2009)

Dogs 36% of households; Cats 23% of households

Human populations comparing NSW and total UK:

  • NSW population 7,238,819
  • UK population   62,218,761
  • Aus population 22,238, 800

 Based on the figures above: 

Cats and dogs per head of population

UK  2.99 people per cat/dog

Australia 3.7 people per cat/dog

Now, lets look at some comparisons between NSW and UK stats

Dogs handled by Councils

Dogs handled by UK Councils (10-11) 126, 176 = 493 people per dog ( dogs handled by council relative to population)

Dogs handled by NSW Councils (10-11) 48,523 = 149 people per dog ( dogs handled by council relative to population)

 Ie nearly 3 times more dogs enter NSW Pounds per head of population than the UK

 

Dogs killed by Councils

Dogs pts UK Councils   7121 = 8,737 people per dog killed

Dogs pts NSW Councils 13,707 (Taskforce Paper) = 528 people per dog killed

Ie 16.5  times more dogs per head of population, are killed by NSW Councils, than by UK Councils

Council kill rates (dogs killed as a percent of dogs entering Pounds)

UK Council kill rate = 7121 / 126, 176 =  6%

NSW Council kill rate = 13,707 / 48,523 = 28%

Ie the kill rate in Council pounds as a percent of dogs coming in is 4.6 times higher in NSW than in the UK

Conclusion:

We have a serious problem in NSW,  when compared to the UK. We urge the NSW government to take immediate action on recommendations made by the NSW Companion Animal Taskforce when they are published.

Note: some people might argue that a comparison between a single Australian State and the total UK is an unfair comparison. Certainly, there are Regions of the UK where statistics are worse than the national average. However, we feel that  this analysis represents a picture demonstrating that NSW must take seriously efforts to reduce dogs entering pounds and significantly increasing dogs leaving pounds safely. Whilst similar figures are less readily available for cats in the uk, let’s not forget our feline friends in NSW.

Note: Deathrowpets have taken statistics from other organisation publications quoted and cannot warrant accuracy of those figures

Information required on Dogs NSW…….

Dogs NSW have contacted their members to object to an Option proposed in the NSW animal welfare Taskforce 2012, an Option they themselves recommended, being an integral member of that Taskforce.

Click here to understand what’s going on….

To be specific, they support Breeder Licencing for non Dogs NSW members, and want an EXEMPTION for themselves ( cynical us believe this would drive more membership applications, but that’s another matter).

They want “self-regulation”.: From their paper to members:

“Dogs NSW Breeders already have in place a well regulated system which provides for; 

 • Education and Training prior to the granting of a Breeder’s Prefix 
• Proof of Residential Address verifying actual location of approved breeding premises 
• Compulsory Microchipping prior to registration 
• Availability of the Limited Register to restrict breeding of surplus animals 
• A Code of Ethics which sets the highest standards in breeding practises and commits all Registered Breeders 
to compliance with all relevant legislation 
• A regulated investigation and inquiry program to deal with breaches of our Code 
• A traceable Membership Number which can be used in puppy advertisements 
The  Taskforce  proposal  has  the  potential  to  add  a  further  tier  of  registration  on  Dogs  NSW  Breeders 
which would  undoubtedly bring with it unnecessary and unjustifiable further regulation and costs. Dogs 
NSW Members need to be one voice in opposing it. “

DRP Comment:

We think this is as good a time as any to reveal cracks in their “well regulated system” and breaches of their Code, and breaches of their “regulated investigation program” on breaches of their code,  which we are told that they often ignore.

Action you can take: 

If you have information, direct experience, or evidence, please post your story in the comments section below. We will never reveal your name or email details – all is confidential. Please, only FACTS and information, no exaggerations! We don’t want a legal letter from Dogs NSW ……..

And if they ARE squeaky clean, then that’s OK too!

Dogs NSW sabotages NSW Animal WelfareTaskforce recommendations……..

Dogs NSW is an integral member of the NSW Animal Welfare Taskforce.
The Taskforce is chaired by the Member for Charlestown, Mr Andrew Cornwell MP, and consists of representatives of the following organisations, invited by the Ministers to participate:
  • ·    Animal Welfare League NSW (AWL NSW),
  • ·    Australian Companion Animal Council (ACAC),
  • ·    Australian Institute of Local Government Rangers (AILGR),
  • ·    Australian Veterinary Association (AVA),
  • ·    Cat Protection Society of NSW (CPS),
  • ·    Local Government and Shires Associations of NSW (LGSA),
  • ·    Dogs NSW,
  • ·    Pet Industry Association Australia (PIAA), and
  • ·    Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals NSW (RSPCA).
Representatives of the Division and DPI also participate on the Taskforce.”

 The Taskforce public discussion paper was released earlier this month.. It contained several recommendations in the form of “Options”.

 “Option 1   Introduce a breeder licensing system

Key findings

There  are  effective  regulatory  mechanisms  in  NSW  to  prosecute  unethical breeders, including “puppy farmers”. However, enforcement relies on complaints from the community.

Some animal welfare agencies and industry bodies have indicated their support for the introduction of breeder licensing as a means to further strengthen the regulation of companion animal breeding practices and there is a move towards such licensing in other jurisdictions.

 A breeder licensing system could be developed to improve consistency in the regulation of cat and dog breeders by providing a “welfare tick of approval” with the aim of ensuring that breeders are ethical sellers. Licence requirements could be based on the enforceable standards of the Animal Welfare Code of Practice – Breeding Dogs and Cats. However, this system could be complemented by updating the  existing  guidelines  contained  within  the  Code  of  Practice  to  enforceable standards (see Option 2).”

 

All  good so far ……..so imagine our surprise ( actually, that’s a fib, we weren’t surprised at all) when we received the following information: READ MORE HERE

What are they doing about the problems at Grafton Pound and what you can do to help?

Grafton Animal Rescue sent this letter to their Council in April:

“The Grafton animal shelter facility is located in South Grafton and is a council service of the Clarence Valley which covers an area of some 10.440Km 2; it services 44 towns and city environments.

Built many years ago, what was once fitting in its day has been allowed to decline in both quality of animal care and maintenance for several years. This is not the fault of the current staff members who do whatever they can under the present conditions. read more here